Plough Sunday blessing ‘means a lot’ to farmers

Plough Sunday Service at St Edmundsbury Cathedral   Pictured: The Revd Canon Sally Fogden, Agricultural Chaplain   PICTURE: Mecha Morton
Plough Sunday Service at St Edmundsbury Cathedral Pictured: The Revd Canon Sally Fogden, Agricultural Chaplain PICTURE: Mecha Morton

A service to mark Plough Sunday held at St Edmundsbury Cathedral saw farm equipment blessed ahead of the traditional start of work on the land.

The working tractor and plough, supplied by Euston Estate director Andrew Blenkiron, were blessed by agricultural chaplain The Rev Canon Sally Fogden in front of the Norman Tower, following the regular Evensong service.

Plough Sunday Service at St Edmundsbury Cathedral   Pictured: The Revd Canon Sally Fogden, Agricultural Chaplain   PICTURE: Mecha Morton

Plough Sunday Service at St Edmundsbury Cathedral Pictured: The Revd Canon Sally Fogden, Agricultural Chaplain PICTURE: Mecha Morton

The Rev Canon Matthew Vernon, cathedral sub-dean, said: “We had a good number of people attending, including members of the farming community who wouldn’t normally be at the cathedral.

“I think it means a lot to the farming community to have their vital work recognised in this way.

“Plough Sunday follows an ancient tradition of asking for God’s blessing for their work.”

A special anthem written by James Thomas, cathedral director of music, was sung by the choir after the blessing.

Plough Sunday service at St Edmundsbury Cathedral: Canon Matthew Vernon, The Rev Canon Philip Banks, Andrew Blenkiron (estate director of the Euston Estate) and The Rev Canon Sally Fogden, agricultural chaplain    PICTURE: Mecha Morton

Plough Sunday service at St Edmundsbury Cathedral: Canon Matthew Vernon, The Rev Canon Philip Banks, Andrew Blenkiron (estate director of the Euston Estate) and The Rev Canon Sally Fogden, agricultural chaplain PICTURE: Mecha Morton

Plough Sunday is an old tradition to celebrate the start of the agricultural year. The ceremony also saw prayers for the blessing of the land.

It is traditionally held on the Sunday after Epiphany, with work in the fields historically not starting until the Monday.

The day is now seen as a way of celebrating farming, farmers and the wider farming community.

Plough Sunday Service at St Edmundsbury Cathedral ''''PICTURE: Mecha Morton

Plough Sunday Service at St Edmundsbury Cathedral ''''PICTURE: Mecha Morton